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Duff Goldman, Bruce Seidel on New YouTube Cooking Channel HUNGRY

Duff Goldman, Bruce Seidel on New YouTube Cooking Channel HUNGRY


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Back in May, YouTube announced the launch of their new food channel, HUNGRY, helmed by Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran Bruce Seidel.

HUNGRY, which goes live July 2, is part of YouTube's master plan to spawn some 100 channels of niche topics. Already, they've signed on Duff Goldman from Ace of Cakes to start up Duff's Food World, a variety show with visits to restaurants and festivals. So why would two Food Network veterans jump onto an Internet show?

"There's so much stuff that Food Network doesn’t let me do," Goldman told us at Internet Week's closing party. "I just have a goofy sense of humor, and I want to be able to do that. There were just so many times I was told, 'No, no, no, ehh, it’s a little too edgy for us.'"

As for Seidel, he finds that there's more flexibility online, plus a wider audience of niche topics like gluten-free or vegan diets. "If you want to learn how to do something and you need specific information, the web allows you to do that in your own terms and your own way," he told us. "You can pause, you can rewind it, you can play it again."

Seidel tells us he plans to program segments anywhere between one minute to eight minutes, working with the standard two to three minute online videos for recipe demos and how-tos while playing with longer forms. Goldman's program specifically will be a variety show with tours, trips, and restaurant visits.

"We'll be going to restaurants or the kinds of food festivals that aren’t, you know, industry people just sitting around blowing each other kind of thing," Goldman said. "I like to think we’re going to be doing programming for the younger crowd, but I kind of feel like there's a lot of people who love Cooking Channel, Food Network, but they want a little more. They want a little naughty, they want a little flavor, you know?"

And as for whether or not food TV will disappear from television sets? While Seidel notes that the younger generation grew up using smartphones, tablets, and computers, Goldman just figures food television will be forced to expand.

"For these guys, all the networks, they don’t have to evolve because there’s nothing for them to compete with except each other," Goldman said. "So a network will do a show, the show will do well, and all these other networks copy that show and make their own version, and then it’s just boring TV."

Expect some cursing and more jokes on Goldman's YouTube show, then, and maybe on network television in the future.

"I think with this you’re really going to see it’s very personality driven stuff and I think the kind of personalities that network execs are a little afraid of," Goldman speculates. "Edgy, younger, maybe they drop the f-bomb once in a while. Food Network is so squeaky clean, it was kind of nice to be on there and be like, 'Hey guys we don’t have to be for 60-year-olds. There are some kids that love this show.'"

Check out a preview for a HUNGRY show Summer Desserts Unplugged with Laura Vitale, below. The season premieres next Wednesday, June 27.

This article was originally published May 18, 2012.

Jessica Chou is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @jesschou.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


YouTube launching food channel with TV veterans

Bruce Seidel is confident the future of food television won't be seen on television.

Which is why the Food Network and Cooking Channel veteran has checked out of network TV to oversee the launch of YouTube's latest original content channel, HUNGRY. The channel, which goes live July 2, is expected to feature a freewheeling blend of how-to and celebrity-driven food videos.

The venture is part of the Google Inc.-owned video site's plan to launch roughly 100 channels of niche-oriented programming. Earlier this month, YouTube pledged to spend some $200 million to help market those channels across Google and its advertising network.

Seidel was drawn to the project in part for YouTube's ability to create a more direct community with viewers than generally is possible with network television. It also offered more flexibility not just for viewers, but also for producers, who can more easily experiment with format and content.

YouTube also offers an enviably large and young demographic, truly the icing on advertisers' cake.

"The wonderful thing about YouTube is it has 800 million users worldwide and they all need to eat," Seidel said in a telephone interview. "I'd like to get just 1 percent of them."

YouTube content historically has been dominated by low- and no-budget user generated videos. But Seidel, a former top executive at Food Network who oversaw the launch of its sister network, Cooking Channel, said HUNGRY will feature professionally produced videos worthy of any network.

At launch, videos will stick mostly with YouTube convention, running one to three minutes, with new episodes posted weekly. Seidel said they also are eager to explore longer format videos. By the end of the summer, the channel hopes to have close to a dozen series, all produced in partnership with multimedia studio Electus-IAC, which is responsible for the channel's content.

One of the series will feature fellow Food Network alumnus Duff Goldman, the cake master behind that channel's reality show "Ace of Cakes." Goldman's YouTube program, "Duff's Food World," will be a sometimes irreverent variety show focused on food pop culture, including visits to unusual restaurants and spotlights of humorous food clips from the Web and TV.

Goldman also will serve as a talent and programming consultant for HUNGRY. In that role, he said he is eager to push food television both forward and backward.

"Basically, the cooking show on television is almost dead," he said. "When you look at the programming on any kind of cable food channel, you kind of find that everything is being replaced by travelogues, competition, reality. There is not a lot of instruction."

YouTube's ability to promote a simple two-minute video on how to roast a chicken - something simply not done on network television - is just as alluring as creating content that pushes boundaries, Goldman said.

"It's magic. It doesn't have any boundaries. I don't need to make it 22 minutes. I don't need to make any sponsors happy. I can get away with stuff," he said.

Other series already in production include "Brothers Green," which features a pair of Brooklyn brothers who are musicians and "underground caterers" tackling new culinary challenges every week, and "Casserole Queens," which focuses on two Austin women who favor retro food and entertaining.

Flexing its ability to focus on micro-niches, HUNGRY also plans series on pork, gluten-free cooking and Italian desserts.

The point is to simply try new things, Goldman said. If it works, it will continue. If it doesn't, it won't.

"Food is very precious. People get a little too serious about it," he said. "There's room for the very serious culinarians. But I also like to laugh at myself. So we're going to do a lot of comedy. Because there's a lot of comedy in food."

Earlier this month, YouTube announced the launch of several other channels, including Wigs, which will focus on scripted dramas for women and TeamUSA, which will feature content ahead of the 2012 Olympic Games.


Watch the video: Chef Duff Goldmans Clementine Cake - Home u0026 Family


Comments:

  1. Slevin

    I am sure this is the wrong path.

  2. Haldane

    Thanks for the explanation.



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